Tom And Jerry Episodes

Saturday, July 30 by Lennox West

While there were later adaptations of the cartoon during the 1960s, 1970s and 1990s, some of the best "Tom and Jerry" episodes appeared during the original Hanna-Barbera years. The classic cartoon "Tom and Jerry" was produced by the Hanna-Barbera animation company, the same team behind later hits "The Jetsons" and "The Flintstones". Here are ten of the best "Tom and Jerry" episodes.

  1. "Cue Ball Cat" (1950) – Set in a pool hall, this "Tom and Jerry" episode features Tom as a pool shark. When he makes a trick shot (by moving the hole), his ball rolls into the corner pocket where Jerry is sleeping. After Jerry is literally rolled out of bed and smashed between two balls, he comes out to confront Tom.
  2. "Little School Mouse" (1954) – Jerry, a certified instructor in the art of "outwitting cats", runs a class to teach his skills to young mice. He runs through a few drills in class and then takes his young student out for some real-world experience with Tom.
  3. "Sufferin' Cats!" (1943) – This "Tom and Jerry" episode opens with Jerry attached to a fishing line. Once Tom reels him in, he makes a scary face to cause Jerry to run away and then begins reeling him in again. Tired of being the cat's toy, Jerry grabs onto a bag of jerked beef. When Tom finally reels the line back in, all that's attached is a piece of the package that reads "JERK".
  4. "The Duck Doctor" (1952) – Tom goes duck hunting and wounds a duckling. When the duckling crash lands in front of Jerry's home, Jerry patches up his arm, incurring Tom's wrath.
  5. "Polka Dot Puss" (1949) – There's a thunderstorm brewing outside and Tom will try anything to avoid being put outside for the night, even faking being sick. Jerry knows Tom is faking, and when Tom chases him, Jerry puts him through all sorts of torture, including washing his mouth out with soap and snapping his nose in a mousetrap.
  6. "Mouse Cleaning" (1948) – Just as the housekeeper finishes cleaning up, Tom runs in the house, covering the kitchen floor and walls with mud. She tells him to clean everything before she gets back home. Jerry spends this entire episode doing things to make the house filthy.
  7. "Just Ducky" (1953) – The little duckling reappears in this "Tom and Jerry" episode. Since he can't swim, he's left behind when his mother and siblings swim down a stream. Jerry finds him crying on the shore and takes him in. When he leaves to find a pair of water wings, the duckling accidentally wanders into Tom's stew.
  8. "The Two Mouseketeers" (1952) – Set in medieval France, this Oscar-winning "Tom and Jerry" episode features Jerry and his young mouse companion as "mouseketeers" trying to intercept Tom's royal mission. The episode has a classic chase scene across a French feast with the mice using a champagne cork as a cannonball.
  9. "The Truce Hurts" (1948) – One of the "Tom and Jerry" episodes featuring Spike the bulldog, this cartoon opens with all three character fighting – Jerry hitting Tom, Tom bonking Spike, Spike taking a swing at Tom. After Spike negotiates a peace treaty among the three, they all fall asleep as buddies. When it comes time to divide a large steak, though, the claws come back out again.
  10. "The Yankee Doodle Mouse" (1943) – As Tom chases Jerry through a "Cat Raid Shelter", Jerry fights back by pelting Tom with tomatoes, eggs and champagne corks. This entire cartoon plays out like a war, with Jerry holding the position of Lieutenant and sending completed war missives stating his successful "sinking" of Tom. This "Tom and Jerry" episode also won an Academy Award.

-Selena Robinson

Do you like this story?

COMMENTS

  1. July 30, 2011 2:31 pm

    KBC

    Calling animated short films “episodes” is a misnomer: it implies these cartoons originally appeared on television, when they wee produced for movie theaters.

    Also, the original Tom & Jerry cartoons were not produced by Hanna-Barbera. William Hanna and Joseph Barbera were indeed the writer-directors on the series, but from 1940 to 1957 they were working for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s animation department. When MGM closed their animation studio in 1957, Hanna and Barbera took much of the staff from their unit and formed Hanna-Barbera Productions at that time.