Reviews - Page 10

Review: ‘The Losers’
Thursday, April 22 by

The LosersPG-13, 95m., 2010Cast: Jeffery Dean Morgan, Idris Elba, Columbus Short, Chris Evans with Zoe Saldana and Jason PatricDirected by Sylvain WhiteScreenplay by Peter Berg and James Vanderbilt based upon graphic novel series, “Ante Up” written by Andy Diggle and illustrations by Jock 

Review: ‘Death at a Funeral’
Friday, April 16 by

Death at a Funeral R, 93m., 2010Cast: Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence, Zoe Saldana, James Marsden, Columbus Short, Regina King, Keith David, Peter Dinkaledge with Loretta Devine, Luke Wilson, Tracy Morgan…

Review: ‘Kick-Ass’
Wednesday, April 14 by

Kick-AssR, 118m., 2010Cast: Aaron Johnson, Chloe Mortez, Christopher Mitz-Plasse, Mark Strong, and Nicolas CageDirected by Matthew VaughnScreenplay by Jane Goldman and Matthew Vaughn based upon the Mark Millar comic Kick-Ass…

Review: ‘Clash of the Titans’
Friday, April 2 by

Clash of the TitansPG-13, 118m., 2010Cast: Sam Worthington, Gemma Arterton, Mads Mikkelson, Jason Fleming with Ralph Fiennes and Liam NeesonDirected by Louis LeterrierScreenplay by Travis Becham, Phillip Hay, and Max…

DVD Review: ‘The Bourne Series’
Tuesday, January 19 by

If you’re like me, and you’re still not convinced you should shell out the extra cash for a Blu-Ray player (case it point: my “revolutionary” mini-DV player is now worth $4 on Craig’s List), then the re-release of the Bourne Series on flipper discs is a good compromise. Like Jason Bourne himself the three discs don’t quite know what they are— DVD on one side and Blu-Ray on the other—which actually is perfectly fine with me: I won’t feel like a moron adding an obsolete DVD or un-tested Blu-Rays to my library. Read more after the jump.

DVD Review: Inglourious Basterds
Monday, December 14 by

I sat down this weekend to watch Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds again, and while I thoroughly enjoyed it the first time around, I have to say the second time made me love it on a whole new level. Maybe it's because in between chapters I could pause to get a snack, check my email, or shout at the people loitering outside my window. Whatever it was, the film was ultimately more enjoyable. It's even perfectly structured for these kind of A.D.D. breaks. You can watch a self-contained segment, do your thing, and then return to the movie with a full stomach and/or an empty bladder.You can read the original review of the film here, and check out my review of the Inglourious Basterds Special Edition 2-Disc DVD after the jump.

Review: Paranormal Activity
Friday, October 2 by

I'm tasked with reviewing this movie but am utterly loath to give away any of the events of the movie itself. I'll keep it very, very basic (and I encourage you to skip any trailers, commercials, or in-depth descriptions): A couple has been experiencing strange events in their house so the boyfriend (Micah) buys a video camera to catch it on film so they can maybe figure out what's happening. That's about all you need to know about the plot. The movie is filmed entirely with Micah's camera and it alternates between daytime shots, where the couple discuss what's happening, and a static nighttime bedroom shot, where Micah sets the camera on a tripod so they can see what happens while they sleep. Aside from allowing some breathing room between scares, the alternating day-and-night mechanic is extremely efficient at creating a basic psychological response for the viewer–as soon as you see that static night shot, you tense up, grab the arm rest, your eyes start to water, and you get goose bumps like no one's business–and nothing's even happened yet.

REVIEW: ‘INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS’
Tuesday, August 11 by

Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds.  You have to think the movie would make Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen-amounts of money if every moviegoer were Jewish and an action movie aficionado.  While we at Screen Junkies are decidedly action movie lovers, we are also mostly of the gentile persuasion.  So, while we already have our Basterds tickets for opening weekend, we fully appreciate how gratifying the film might be all the more gratifying for someone whose family had to actually endure the atrocities of the Nazis. The idea of hearing a Jewish perspective on a movie that centers on Jews brutally killing a bunch of people who brutally killed Jews always had an interesting ring to it.  Luckily for us, our friends at Heeb Magazine read our minds, and passed writer Oliver Noble's review of the flick on to us for a gander.  As you can see from the beginning of Noble's piece, Tarantino seems to have nailed his key demo:

REVIEW: (500) DAYS OF SUMMER
Monday, August 3 by

It’s been several days now, and I can’t quite get this movie out of my head.  (500) DAYS OF SUMMER is one of those rare films that actually speaks to…

REVIEW: ‘DISTRICT 9′
Tuesday, July 28 by

To Whoever Shut Down The Halo Film:I had my sneaking suspicions before, but now I can safely say that you are all complete idiots.  Let me make one thing clear: I have yet to actually read why you shut down the Peter Jackson-produced and Neill Blomkamp-directed adaptation of the popular video game franchise Halo.  I believe I read at one point that it was something related to money.  I find this funny, because it seems like if you had just made the movie, it would have made tons of money.  More money than you could ever imagine…

ANDY ROONEY REVIEWS ‘BRUNO’
Tuesday, July 7 by

By Andy Rooney, of CBS's "60 Minutes"My primary care physician has recommended that I find a way to put more exercise into my daily routine. Normally I avoid all forms of physical exertion, but seeing as I’m no spring chicken anymore I decided it might be in my best interest to take him up on his suggestion.  I wouldn’t want to die and miss out on this newfangled digital television.  (Sometimes it’s hard to convey sarcasm through writing.  So let me just tell you last night I almost electrocuted myself walking into the HDTV my son bought me for Christmas.  It thought it was a doorway to the beach and I had my metal detector in hand.  Turns out I forgot to turn off the Travel Channel.)

REVIEW: ‘THE HURT LOCKER’
Friday, June 26 by

This week, we've covered the Transformers from about every possible angle – except their nether regions, because Bay has that covered.  But there's another film starting today that deserves far more asses in seats than Bay's bombastic sequel.  I'm talking about THE HURT LOCKER, which – if you couldn't tell from the pull quote above – Screenjunkies thinks is just about the tensest movie that's come out since NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN. 

‘TRANSFORMERS 2′ REVIEW
Wednesday, June 24 by

By Spencer Vickers I am 80% convinced that Michael Bay did not give a sweet sh*t about the first hour and twenty minutes of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.  What occupies that part of the highly anticipated summer flick is about as dumbed down as you would expect from a film that is brought to you by a toy company (I would like to point out that my previous comment was by no means meant as an attack on Hasbro, for without them my childhood would have been severely depressing).  At points the film even borders on offensive (and not the good kind of offensive). 

‘THE HANGOVER’ REVIEW
Friday, June 5 by

“Oh my God…” That was what the woman sitting behind me in the theater kept muttering as we watched The Hangover together.  I have to admit, I had a similar reaction to this clever and raunchy comedy, albeit a silent one.  I can understand why Zach Galifianakis’s ass might elicit such a response, verbal or internal.  In a world of reimaginings and adaptations, it was refreshing to experience an original piece of material taking full advantage of its potential.  The concept is so simple it’s a wonder no one’s thought of it before, but hallelujah for the people out there like Todd Phillips who get creative when delivering big laughs.

‘LAND OF THE LOST’ REVIEW
Friday, June 5 by

  If you're reading this during Land of the Lost's opening weekend and happened to have come here from our homepage, you may have noticed the GIANT LAND OF THE LOST AD enveloping it.  So, for those of you who think our advertisers dictate our reviews, you probably shouldn't read on.  (And those of you who thought our "Best/Worst Movie Time Machines" piece was a thinly-veiled ad for Land of the Lost, you should just stop reading the site entirely.)  Because I genuinely liked Land of the Lost. 

‘TERMINATOR SALVATION’ REVIEW
Thursday, May 21 by

By Afrim, sole member of the Albanian Guard Hello, United States, for one time again. Is Afrim. Is you remember me? I tell you about movie Angels plus Demons. I back in internet café in Baltimore. I is having problems with travel visa and immigration police tell me I can no go back to Albania. Is okay, I have good bed for sleeping at house of my cousin Fatbardha. Is better than box of wood that I am sleeping in Tirana! Is kidding! I has very comfortable mule for sleeping.

‘THE BROTHERS BLOOM’ REVIEW
Friday, May 15 by

I loved Rian Johnson's first film, Brick* – the neo-hard boiled detective story set amongst high school social circles.  It was the one with a bespectacled Joseph Gordon-Levitt, the anachronistic dialogue and the fantastic score by Johnson's brother.  I saw it three times in the theaters.  Even bought it on DVD.  But as I sat down for my screening of Rian Johnson's followup, The Brothers Bloom, a wave of doubt washed over me.  No way he can do it again, I thought.  Besides, the trailers made it seem like a hodgepodge of styles culled from Johnson's contemporaries.  It was Hudson Hawk through the off-kilter lens of Wes Anderson.  Not necessarily a bad thing (I'm one of the few with fond memories of Hawk), but it wasn't promising to be a revelation like Brick…

‘ANGELS & DEMONS’ REVIEW
Friday, May 15 by

By Afrim, sole member of the Albanian Guard

‘STAR TREK’ REVIEW
Thursday, May 7 by

“Star Trek” has been lying on the emergency room table for a good 10 years now, finally flat-lining with the ultra-flop “Nemesis” back in 2003, and then being confirmed dead when the pitiable TV series “Enterprise” was cancelled in 2005.  After having overcome cancellation, diminishing box office returns, and an increasingly maligned mythology only taken seriously by hardcore fanboys, “Star Trek” looked like it had finally breathed its last  Enter JJ Abrams, who has retooled, rebooted, and re-energized this franchise into a slick, hip, action-packed and character-driven summer blockbuster that will bring in much-needed new fans and please plenty of hard-to-satisfy Trekkies.  The hardcore fans won’t be happy, but then again, are they ever?

‘X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE’ REVIEW
Friday, May 1 by

I have to warn you: I’ve been an X-Men fan since I was a young’un, even going so far as to have an X-Men tattoo emblazoned onto my left arm in college.  Regrettably, my choice – a Jim Lee-era black circle with an “X” inside and red filler – can sometimes be mistaken for neo-Nazi chic.  Consequently, my wardrobe will forever include sleeves.  Last week, I caught a screening of X-Men Origins: Wolverine, and director Gavin Hood gave a very sobered speech prior to rolling the film.  In it, he made it crystal clear that the now-infamous leaked version– the one that was critically bashed – was missing about 400 effects shots, an entire score, sound design, and the color timing had not been done, either.  In effect, it was a rough cut.  I haven’t seen it, though I must admit curiosity after rumors came out that the finished film and the leaked version were virtually the same, in terms of the edit.  But I went into it with optimism…

‘OBSESSED’ REVIEWED BY HACKY BLACK COMIC
Friday, April 24 by

By Taco Perkins Editor’s Note: Per Taco Perkins’ request, we have provided a sample of LL Cool J’s “Rock the Bells.”  According to Taco, this will get you in the proper mood for his comical stylings. TacoPerkins Opening – Watch more Funny Videos

REVIEW: ‘CRANK HIGH VOLTAGE’
Friday, April 17 by

 By HaloFan1996

“JAY RIOTTA” REVIEWS “OBSERVE AND REPORT”
Friday, April 10 by

By Jay Riotta

REVIEW: ADVENTURELAND
Friday, April 3 by

You may remember actor Jesse Eisenberg, he’s quite the hot-shot young actor in a circle of “I play disillusioned youngsters wanting to be Holden Caufield” roles. Go down the list….

ANDY ROONEY REVIEWS “FAST & FURIOUS”
Friday, April 3 by

60 MINUTES' ANDY ROONEY REVIEWS FAST & FURIOUSBy Andy Rooney

WWE’S THE BIG SHOW REVIEWS 12 ROUNDS
Friday, March 27 by

By WWE's The Big Show

REVIEW: I LOVE YOU, MAN
Friday, March 20 by

I take issue with the word "Bromance."  But I guess it’s better than Brotonic Brolationship. I Love You, Man is a "bromantic comedy."  That’s it.  And I am fine with…

REVIEW: KNOWING
Friday, March 20 by

Knowing, opening today, is a compelling film that walks the line between horror and science fiction – a genre blend right up the alley of director Alex Proyas, who probably gained the biggest notoriety from the cult fave Dark City.  Unlike Dark City, Knowing takes place in the very real world – Melbourne, Australia doubling amazingly as Massachusetts and NYC – and its story drums up a question that’s come to all our minds at some point: does Earthly life have a purpose, or does “sh*t just happen?” 

REVIEW: The Last House on the Left
Friday, March 13 by

What would you do if bad people raped and left your daughter for dead?  So spouts the basic message of the trailer for The Last House on the Left, and apparently, from the few clips shown, the answer is to kill them in as cinematically gruesome ways as possible (if it’s funny, that’s a plus).  Wes Craven’s original back in 1972 answered this question by showing us what completely disturbed, depraved, and downright terrifying places a human could go if pushed hard enough.  This remake misses the point – most of the killings wind up feeling like those clichés designed only to make you laugh and maybe cringe a little, but hardly ever scare you, and certainly not disturb you.  This much-hyped remake is something of a dud, and you can check out exactly why after the jump.

REVIEW: WATCHMEN
Saturday, March 7 by

I own well over 1,000 comic books collected over the years, and to this day they sit “bagged n’ boarded” for their protection, tucked away safely in my grandparents’ basement.   But I would only consider myself a comic book geek on the superficial level.  I was in it for the pictures.  If it looked cool, I bought it.  If I wanted to read words, I’d buy a novel.  And, with no disrespect to artist Dave Gibbons, I never got into Watchmen because it just didn’t look as cool as, say, Jim Lee’s X-Men, or Rob Liefield’s New Mutants.  In my adulthood, though, I’ve read the book.  It’s dense.  It’s dark.  It’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen.  But I don’t love it like I’m supposed to.