‘Harold & Kumar’ Was Crude, Racist, Sexist, Homophobic, And Enjoyable

Friday, November 4 by
Not a bad flick, provided you're a bad person. 

What can you say about A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas? By the time you reach the third installment of a comedy franchise, you pretty much know what to expect. This film is no exception. Drug use, nudity, racially offensive humor and all the other things you loved or hated from the first two films are here, as is the usual cast of side characters (NPH, anyone?). So the real question isn’t “is this film good?” but rather “do I like juvenile, offensive humor?” Since you’re on this site, I’m going to guess you answered yes to that question. As such, you can do a lot worse than A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas.

While I did enjoy the film, there’s no sense in pretending it was a masterpiece. There are times when the plot becomes overly sappy, and focuses too much on the strained relationship of Harold & Kumar. I know some semblance of a story is necessary even in a stoner comedy, but why drag it out in a film like this? We know they are going to patch things up from the moment we realize there’s a conflict, so there’s no need for sappy, sentimental monologues about friendship.

Another problem I had with the film was the nudity. There wasn’t enough. This is already an R-rated movie, so why pull punches? There were several times where I found myself wondering “Why isn’t she getting topless?” Before you throw a rock at my face, keep in mind I’m not talking about a random female actress playing a waitress. I’m talking about actresses involved in the film’s various sex scenes. If this was almost any other movie, I wouldn’t be acting like such a sexist pig. But this is a Harold & Kumar sequel, so I don’t feel out of line having these expectations.

But those minor (and stupid) points aside, I have no real complaints about this film. Yes, it’s sexist, racially insensitive garbage, but that’s what it sets out to be. Besides, in my opinion, a talking, self-aware, waffle-making robot (which this film prominently features) makes up for anything in the politically incorrect department. So if you’re in the mood for some cheap, often twisted laughs, check it out (or save some cash, and watch it on Netflix in a few months).

But if you’ve uttered the phrase “that’s offensive” any time in the pas 24 hours, go watch Stuck Between Stations. Also, lighten the f*ck up.