Enough, Already: 9 Songs That Are Wildly Overused In Film

Thursday, August 25 by
"I don't wanna hear Sixpence None the Richer!" 

A carefully crafted soundtrack aids the audience in going on a journey with a film’s characters, whereas a lazy soundtrack says, “here’s some happy feel-good crap; Turn your brain off and try not to confuse our film with She’s All That.”

The presence of these songs in any film conveys that the producers want to use something familiar and trite enough that you might confuse their bad movie with some other movie that probably isn’t as awful as the crappy film you’re watching.

Get excited.

9. “Who Let The Dogs Out?” – Baha Men

There was once a time when children’s films were made that didn’t contain this song. It was a simpler, richer time for cinema. If you hear this song and aren’t having an uproarious time, then you aren’t doing what the producers of the movie want you to do. Obey the producers. They work hard. This song is lazily featured in The Hangover, Shallow Hal, Rugrats in Paris, and Snow Dogs, which is delightful, because that film is ABOUT DOGS (being let out).

This song is used when a child, Zach Galifiankis, or an animated animal is raising all kinds of heck. 

8. “Gimme Shelter” – The Rolling Stones

This song became a de facto Scorsese trademark in Goodfellas, Casino, and The Departed, it has also popped up in Air America, Layer Cake, Adventures in Babysitting, Children of Men, and myriad television shows.

This song is used to signify that stuff is happening. 

7. “Semi-Charmed Life” – Third Eye Blind

One of the most ubiquitous songs of the late 90’s crept into more than a handful of films and almost every trailer, letting audiences know that seeing this movie would be a really good time, just like crystal meth, which this song is about. It’s featured in Dirty Work, Mr. Nice Guy, American Pie, Wild Things, and Contact.

This song is used when a creative-type in San Francisco is riding their bike home from work to their apartment and roommates. 

Do you like this story?