6 Musicians With “Talent” Behind the Camera

Monday, October 17 by

4. Fred Durst


 
In the late 90’s, Fred Durst quickly made himself a ubiquitous and often unwelcome presence in the pop-culture landscape with his poorly-spelled rap metal outfit Limp Bizkit. As maligned as Bizkit’s musical sensibilities were, the band served as a conduit for Durst’s directing efforts as he stepped behind the camera for the genuinely inspired videos for the band’s “Rearranged” and “N 2 Gether Now.”

His work caught the eye of another director who got his start with music videos, a Mr. David Fincher. In fact, Fincher had so much faith in Durst that he was whole-hog to produce a Durst project. However, Fincher made the wise decision to focus on Panic Room and Fight Club rather than mentor Durst in the infancy of his career, so Durst puttered along with The Longshots, The Education of Charlie Banks, and the upcoming Pawn Shop Chronicles, as well as a just-announced “comedy” project on CBS.

Fred Durst is hilarious, but can he be INTENTIONALLY funny?

3. Rob Zombie


 
After a reasonably successful career as frontman for the Beavis and Butthead-catapulted metal band White Zombie, he parlayed his band’s gritty, horrific presence into a lucrative career making gritty, horrific horror movies at a time when slick teen fare such as Scream and I Still Know What You BlahBlahBlah had overtaken the genre.

His breakthrough film, House of 1000 Corpses received generally positive reviews and was quickly embraced by fans of the genre as one of the directions horror directors ought to move in.

He has followed up with a semi-sequel The Devil’s Rejects, Halloween, Halloween II, and a Grindhouse trailer (Werewolf Women of the S.S.). Next up his 2012’s The Lords of Salem in which modern day residents of Salem, Mass are visited by a coven of witches. Probably not good witches.

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