6 Movie Props Worth More Than Your House

Sunday, August 11 by Lee Keeler

This could all be relative to the actual value of your home, considering you’ve kept up on your mortgage and maintenance. Time to compare the one thing you can barely afford with a bunch of things you will never be able to afford!

 

 


“Aston Martin DB5″ (“Goldfinger“)

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This silver little dah-link saved 007’s life in the spy’s second film, complete with an ejector seat, machine guns, rotating license plates, a toupee compartment for Sean Connery, a trunk for George Lazenby’s career, an ashtray and a pile of papers apologizing for the blue-eyed Asian guy in “Die Another Day.” It sold for 4.1 million bucks.

 

 


“Maltese Falcon” (“The Maltese Falcon”)

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This statue, valued at nearly $400,000, is available at Skymall.

 

 


“Luke Skywalker’s Lightsaber” (“Star Wars”)

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Even though fairly neato, light-and-sound-equipped knockoffs of this very prop sell for around 30 dollars a piece at comic and sci-fi conventions, you can own the original, which does not come with any of the aforementioned features, for just over $200,000.

 

 


The Mirthmobile (“Wayne’s World”)

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The flames. The licorice whip dispenser. The Discman on the dashboard. The hood upon which the theme to Star Trek was whistled. The back seat where spewing nearly occurred because “o mamma mia mamma mia let me go.” While this vehicle has not technically been sold to any big auction house, it’s cultural value renders it priceless. We’re not worthy.

 

 


Black Dress (“Breakfast at Tiffany’s”)

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One of the three black dresses made for this film sold for pretty much a million dollars. Them’s some expensive mothballs.

 

 


DeLorean DMC-12 (“Back to the Future“)

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Some people wonder why others drive around with garbage in their car. It’s because they’re waiting for the day when they can finally fuel the car with it like Doc Brown would’ve wanted; it’s called forward-thinking. In fact, if we can save the half a million dollars it takes to buy this thing with all the sweet, sweet money that we make blogging, we’d fill this thing with garbage, too.