5 Bullettime Fight Scenes That Ripped Off The Matrix

Monday, July 30 by Gregory Wakeman

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The Wachowski Brothers changed cinema with their 1999 science fiction action film. Their incredible mind bending adventure introduced us to a whole new world of computer craziness, as well as the notion that Keanu Reaves can actually act and a new cinematic element entitled "bullet time." This new slow-motion effect was key to making "The Matrix" unique and it proved to be so successful that an infinite amount of movies decided to steal it! So here are 5 bullet time fight scenes that ripped off "The Matrix."

 

"Shrek"

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DreamWorks' warped fairy tale is regarded as one of the animated genres greatest movies ever, combining an adult sense of humor with a child-like narrative to appeal to a broad audience. A joke that most kids probably didn't get occurred when Princess Fiona decided to emulate Trinity and destroy Robin Hood and his merry men. They weren't so merry by the scene's end.

 

"Spider-Man"

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With Marc Webb's reboot of "The Amazing Spider-Man" making comic book aficionados all but forget about Sam Raimi's incarnation of Peter Parker's exploits, it's probably worth remembering that it was actually a pretty stellar movie. "The Evil Dead" director used every technical advantage he could place his hands on to make "Spider-Man" unique, with bullet time being utlilized to show off his Spidey sense.

 

"The One"

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Jet Li's 2001 movie is an American action movie that basically ripped off plenty of the plot from "The Matrix" but just featured more bullet time sequences, even though it was only made a couple of years after the 1999 endeavour. Alongside Li, it also starred Delroy Lindo, Jason Statham, and Carla Cugino; but despite its all star cast, it was met with mainly negative reviews.

 

"Max Payne"

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It wasn't only movies that were influenced by the Wachowski's bullet time sequences. Video games got in on the act with Remedy Entertainment's 2001 video game "Max Payne" containing several slow-motion mechanics that allowed its players to view where bullets were being fired.

 

"Scary Movie"

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With its success, bullet time was always going to be ridiculed by the cynical members of Hollywood's elite. And they don't get much more sarcastic than the Wayan brothers, with their "Scream" character smoking dope and looking to emulate bullet time, but almost breaking his back in the process.