5 Board Game Movies That Are Actually Good

Tuesday, September 25 by Frost

Board Game

If playing Monopoly makes you ponder how much torture you would endure to never have to play that game again, then this foray into entertainment is probably not for you. If you do get a glint in your eye when you remember epic battles with the roll of the dice, then these 5 board game movies might just hit the spot.

 

"Ouija"

 Ouija

Teaching the valuable lesson that once you start a game you need to finish it, "Ouija" relies on demonic murder instead of good manners to get that important message of across. After attending their grandmother's funeral, a group of relatives decide to pass on typical after-funeral activities in favor of opening a doorway to the spirit world via a handcrafted Ouija board. "Ouija" attends to the aftermath of a bad Ouija session rather than focus on the board throughout the film, which makes it better than the average evil board game flick. The hilarious death by snake scene makes up for the slow, stumbling parts for sure.

 

"Jumanji"

 Jumanji

You have to respect a film for kids that opens with two little kids, filled with fear, burying this apparently world wrecking, soul destroying game a couple of lousy feet in the ground while stating that if someone finds it then "May God have mercy on his soul." Not to be outdone, the movie then shows that a child has been locked in the game for 26 years because his friend got scared and ran off, leaving him trapped. Dark and amusing, "Jumanji" fits in touching themes of bravery, forgiveness, friendship, and love that make this one of the best board game movies. Good monkeys are cliche by now, so it's nice to see some evil monkey bastards get tail deep in some home remodeling in a great, possibly urine soaked scene.

 

"Clue"

 Clue

Love it or hate it, "Clue" will evoke a passionate response from the viewer. It helps that Tim Curry, of the acting chops and wicked voice, gets to play the central character to the ensuing chaos. One auspicious night a group of strangers are invited to an isolated mansion for dinner, all of the guests have secrets they don't wish made public and thus the stage is set for murder. The quickness and severity of the murderer dealing with a singing telegram is that perfect awkward scene where you laugh at death before any feelings of guilt can show up.

 

"Battleship"

 Battleship

"Battleship" may be an alien filled tragedy of a film but it ends up being a board game movie that is a good lesson on global economics. With the rough acting and goofy plot devices you'd expect "Battleship" to be a gigantic failure that would finally force movie executives to dig deeper for stories worth the telling. It looked like America was ready to teach that lesson with a dismal domestic box office, but then the foreign nations banded together and rallied to American cinema's aid by throwing their strange sounding currency at it, pushing it nicely into the black. Any film that relies on an advanced alien race not doing any due diligence about battle vulnerabilities, such as not bringing along sunglasses if the sun hurts your alien eyes, is so bad it might just be good. If you can summon the fortitude to make it past the credits, you'll find a subtle scene that ensures that "Battleship 2" is just on the horizon, and be humbled by the lack of doubt anyone associated with the film apparently had about the future.

 

"Zathura"

 Zathura

Essentially "Jumanji" in space. Two kids discover the "Zathura" game and a world of unfriendly science fiction comes calling for them with a vengeance and some explosions. Is it fair to blame this movie for the rise of one of the "Twilight" stars, yes, probably but she does get frozen for a period of time so it's not all bad. A fun flick and a solid promoter of imagination, "Zathura" manages to spread the wonder of outer space and a fear of robots as the boys get a defective robot who loves, loves buzzsaws.

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