10 Best Soundtrack Songs Of All Time

Monday, March 7 by Andrew Jett

The 10 best soundtrack songs of all time can appeal to movie buffs as well as music gurus. A good soundtrack can turn an average film into an emotionally touching masterpiece, and these songs helped add new dimensions to their classic movies

  1. “In Your Eyes” – Peter Gabriel – From the romantic 1989 movie “Say Anything,” this soundtrack song was featured in the climax of the film. Gabriel’s gentle vocals and soaring chorus in this song were the best thing on the soundtrack.
  2. “Damn It Feels Good to Be a Gangsta” – Geto Boys - The 1999 cult favorite “Office Space” had several notable songs on its soundtrack, but none more so than this. With its slick and profane gangsta rap edge, this soundtrack song somehow fits perfectly in a movie about a bunch of corporate white dudes.
  3. “Fight The Power” – Public Enemy – Spike Lee’s powerful 1989 film “Do The Right Thing” wouldn’t have been as effective without featuring this soundtrack song. Volatile and explosive, this song deftly expresses youthful rage against the system.
  4. “Theme From Shaft” – Isaac Hayes – As the elder statesman on the list of the ten best soundtrack songs of all time, this tune dates all the way back to the 1971 movie “Shaft.” Hayes’ soundtrack song was a breakthrough in musical technique, using a mix of funk and soul to create a brand new subgenre.
  5. “Footloose” – Kenny Loggins – In 1984, nobody was as big as Kenny Loggins. This soundtrack song from the Kevin Bacon film “Footloose” was upbeat and irresistible. Loggins single-handedly set the tone for the entire movie, and American viewers tapped their feet right along with him.
  6. “Girl, You’ll Be A Woman Soon” – Urge Overkill – Slick, hip and impossible to avoid in 1994, the soundtrack to the movie “Pulp Fiction” contained a stellar collection of great songs. The soundtrack’s highlight is this Neil Diamond-penned classic, staying true to the original but updated just enough to become relevant again.
  7. “Don’t You Forget About Me” – Simple Minds - Since its release in 1985, this soundtrack song from the classic ‘80s movie “The Breakfast Club” has made dozens of appearances in films and television. Simple Minds’ biggest hit song was a great fit for the movie soundtrack, with melancholy vocals crooned over a perfectly cheesy synthesizer riff.
  8. “My Heart Will Go On” – Celine Dion – If you were somehow able to avoid the 1997 juggernaut “Titanic,” you were living on the moon. Dion’s soaring vocal in this song helped propel the album to over thirty million sales worldwide, no small feat for a primarily orchestral soundtrack.
  9. “Bohemian Rhapsody” – Queen – Everything old is new again. After appearing on the soundtrack to the 1992 film “Wayne’s World,” Queen’s 1975 song endeared itself to a whole new generation. Quirky and memorable, this soundtrack song played a major role in the movie’s best scene. 
  10. “Tiny Dancer” – Elton John – As one of the most underappreciated entries on the list of the ten best soundtrack songs of all time, this tune from the 2000 movie “Almost Famous” deserves any praise it gets. Lyricist Bernie Taupin is at his best in this soundtrack song, with endearing and poetic lines like “Hold me closer, tiny dancer / Count the headlights on the highway.”
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COMMENTS

  1. March 7, 2011 5:12 pm

    Anonymous

    It is BEYOND ABSURD to label this “all-time” when cinema “soundtracks” that is with specific compositions to be played live during the presentation span 100 years and the oldest film in this list is 1971′s Shaft – and then not another until 1985. My two favorite soundtracks both predate my birth, 1950′s Third Man Theme by Anton Karas (which was in the Beatles early repertoire) and “Tara’s Theme” from Gone with the Wind by Max Steiner.
    I loved the use of Peter Gabriel’s “In Your Eyes” in “Say Anything”, but not as much as the use of Leonard Cohen’s “Sisters of Mercy”, etc. in Robert Altman’s 1971 “McCabe and Mrs. Miller”.
    One should be much, much more careful with big terms like “All Time” –