Scariest Mexican Films

Monday, April 4 by Karsun

Horror movies are a genre that many people enjoy and foreign horror such as the scariest Mexican films are no exception. Whether you're a fan of Guillermo Del Toro or just enjoy a good scare with the classics (even with subtitles) you'll love these scariest Mexican films. You may even find a new horror offering that you weren't aware of before, Mexican horror.

  1. "The Devil's Backbone" (2001). This Guillermo Del Toro movie is a perfect example of scary Mexican films. It's about an orphanage in the middle of nowhere during the end of the civil war in Spain. There's not only the threat of a ghost, there's the frightening caretakers of the orphanage and the remnants of the war; a bomb that is poised to blow the orphanage sky high. The Spanish name of this film is "El espinazo del diablo" and it's one of Del Toro's best movies. It stars Marisa Paredes and Eduardo Noriega.
  2. "The Orphanage" (2007). "El orfanato" is a movie about a woman and her husband who start an orphanage for handicapped children at her old family home. Her son starts talking to an imaginary playmate that may or may not be more real than you think. This movie was produced by Guillermo Del Toro and stars Belen Rueda and Fernando Cayo.
  3. "La Sexorcista" (1975). "Satanico Pandemonium" is about an innocent nun that gives her heart to Satan and then the violence and gore ensues. The effects are cheap and the story is cliche but it's a classic 70's movie that has a few scares up its sleeve. It stars Cecelia Pezet and is available on Mondo Macabro DVD.
  4. "Cementerio del Terror" (1985). This low budget horror movie is a slasher vs. zombie flick about a doctor that wants to raise the deal; mainly a serial killer named Devlon. His medical students decide to play a prank and steal the body for their very own "raise the dead" ceremony. Theirs works, his does not but the effect is the same – violence and cheap gore. It was directed by Ruben Galindo Jr.
  5. "Brainiac" (1961). No list of scariest Mexcian films can be complete without adding the 1961 film about a warlock executed during the Spanish Inquisition. The warlock vows to return in 300 years although we have no idea why it will take him 300 years to exact his revenge since the folks that killed him would be long dead. Even more so, why does he return as a space monster? No one can be sure but it's essential Mexican horror.

There you have it, the scariest Mexican films. Some are campy and some are dead serious but they all have thrills and chills that horror aficionados have grown to appreciate and savor.