Scary Latino Religion Movies

Saturday, August 20 by Frost

A true fan of film can't be stuck in the rut of only watching movies in his birth language so why not check out the 10 Best Scary Latino Religion Movies. The concept of good and evil provides a solid foundation for stories. The conquering and failing of the self and the group leads to utilizing religion in various aspects such as these films show:

"The Orphanage"

Named The Good Shepherd orphanage, though the chapel is in disrepair, religion tends to be a background character as Simon and Tomas play. The shocks to the system are in grand style here as well as a truly frightening cave. Children in horror films are often either creepy or two-dimensional but in this scary Latino movie they come off as powerful, fully envisioned characters. The stained glass Shepherd gets framed at pivotal moments presenting a watchful God.

"The Devil's Backbone"

The cross here is used not just as protection from evil in the form of a military but to hide evil in the form of a murder. It's another orphanage and ghosts story but it's poignant and genuine. A great twist ending seals this as a great Latino movie.

"The Secret in Their Eyes"

It's a stunning film about the quest for truth not only as relates to two horrible events but what consequences befall the truth seeker when everything is made clear. Although no overt religious themes are presented, the themes of love, evil, justice and what should be brought to light or left unexposed make this a religion themed movie. The slow build to the ending makes this a contemporary Latino classic for the world.

"Shiver"

The protagonist can't risk exposure to sunlight while the villain could suntan for days.  The portrayal of seeing the truth while needing the shroud of darkness to do so is a great metaphor for religion based movies. The environment of this movie accents the plot without being overbearing.

"Apocalypto"

When the setting of a movie leaves you on edge the entire time it's truly a great scary movie. Jaguar Paw's flight is breathtaking as well as the portrayal of the Mayan religion. Though not much in subtlety the overt violence leaves one contemplative and hopefully more aware of the repercussions of following a darkened path.

"Stranded: I've Come from a Plane That Crashed on the Mountains"

An actual tale of real world cannibalism. A documentary that brings the fullest meaning of the word "Survival" to the viewer. Marcelo is quoted as saying, "Think of it as Holy Communion" and there you have the battle between violating religious mores and living another day.

"The Other Conquest"

A man's fight to keep his own faith while under subjugation from another religion. Topiltzin's whipping as part of his renouncement of his faith is gripping and horrendous. When religion fights religion are there ever any victors?

"The Devil's Miner"

Take a real place, add a death toll of millions and then have it under the earth and you have a documentary that reignites a fear of the dark and dark powers. "El Tio" translates as uncle but is also associated with being the spirit of the mountain as well as the devil and it's in the worker's respect and fear that this film brings an almost palpable dread to life. Watching two children discuss the concept of devil worship is chilling and makes this a perfect scary Latino movie for this list.

"The Nameless"

This film features a child-sacrificing cult which doesn't make a happy film. A religion of evil that takes innocence to fuel it brings the goose bumps home in this Latino film. Light on plot but heavy on mood the stalker ex is the best psychotic man I've seen since the block party.

"Tombs of the Blind Dead"

Here we have the Templar Knights, not the nicest group in history, throwing their blood sacrifices and cruel sensibilities around the place. Though a definite Latino horror film there's enough 1970's music scoring to make this evil fun.  The ending is nothing but pure awesome.

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