Put Pen to Paper with these Famous Writers

Monday, October 3 by Mike Harris

While it’s usually actors and directors who get the credit for great movies, it is people like these famous writers who make movies possible. Their names may overshadowed by the bright lights on the actors, but they have arguably the most important job in film. C'mon, they create the stories themselves. There would be NO story, without the writer. The following five screenwriters busted through that convention, earning fame from the popularity and acclaim their films attained.

Spike Lee.

Most often seen at New York Knicks games (even though he’s an Atlanta native), Lee is more than just a big sports fan. He’s also responsible for writing and directing films such as “Jungle Fever” and “He Got Game”. To most, Lee is known for writing screenplays with heavy ethnic and cultural themes. But, beyond that, he’s an expressive storyteller. His characters, no matter how objectionable their actions might be, are always relatable.

Aaron Sorkin.

Best known for his triumphant “The Social Network,” Sorkin’s ability to create fast-paced, impressively witty dialogue is unmatched. So good, in fact, that if Sorkin wrote a screenplay for the next “Transformers” installment. How awesome would that be if Optimus Prime won an Oscar? If you’re willing to pay close attention and rewind occasionally to catch something you missed, a movie created by this famous writer would suit you well.

Woody Allen.

Another famous New Yorker, Woody Allen is among the most heralded comedy writers of all time. He’s known for his supremely awkward, neurotic, and obsessive sense of humor. From the acclaimed “Annie Hall” to the more recent “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”, Allen’s work is uniquely endearing to countless quirky fans.

Charlie Kaufman.

This famous writer achieved his status in Hollywood through the merit of his uniqueness. With movies such as “Being John Malkovich” and “Adaptation” credited to him, Kaufman is creatively unbound by typical movie-making rules. In a film market flooded with rehashes, rewrites, and sequels, Kaufman’s work is often a refreshin break from the norm-even if it is a little weird.

M. Night Shyamalan.

This famous writer’s first real success, a little movie called “The Sixth Sense” also happened to be his last. Once considered a prodigious writer and director, the view of Shyamalan according to critics and moviegoers has fallen sharply over the years. Known for adding some sort of plot twist in every one of his films, it seems that the shock value of and general interest in his writing style has faded considerably. That said, Shyamalan’s still a young guy with plenty of time to fulfill the old Hollywood comeback story. 

Do you like this story?