Greatest Film Directors Of All Time

Wednesday, April 27 by Shawn Lealos

The greatest film directors of all time have directed masterpieces that stand the test of time. These men have created a body of work that exemplifies the creative genius of cinema and have numerous films listed among the best of all time. They range from the advent of cinema to men still working today.

  1. Steven Spielberg. With a large number of blockbusters and critically acclaimed movies, Steven Spielberg is one of the greatest film directors of all time. He mastered both the summer popcorn movie with “Jaws,” and proved he could be critically accepted with “Saving Private Ryan.” He has won three Oscars.
  2. Martin Scorsese. For the longest time, Martin Scorsese was one of the greatest film directors of all time who never won an Oscar. He finally won his award for “The Departed” in 2007. Before that he created masterpieces like “Raging Bull,” “Goodfellas” and “Taxi Driver.”
  3. John Ford. John Ford is the best director to ever work in the western genre. He made John Wayne a star and directed his best movies, from “Stagecoach” to “The Searchers.” He won four Oscars, his first in 1936 for “The Informer” and his last in 1953 for “The Quiet Man.”
  4. Frank Capra. Frank Capra directed movies that brought the normal, everyman to the forefront as a national hero. Capra won three Oscars for directing from 1935 to 1939 but his most popular movie, “It’s a Wonderful Life” did not garner him an award.
  5. Billy Wilder. Billy Wilder is one of the greatest film directors of all time. He influenced modern directors like Steven Spielberg and Cameron Crowe thanks to his timeless efforts such as “The Apartment” and “Some Like it Hot.” “Sunset Blvd.” is considered one of the best movies ever made about Hollywood.
  6. Alfred Hitchcock. Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most famous directors to ever live. Hitchcock made many of the greatest thrillers of all time, including the iconic “North by Northwest.” His horror movie, “Psycho,” was is often credited as being the first ever slasher movie.
  7. Stanley Kubrick. Stanley Kubrick directed his first studio film in 1955 with the heist movie “Killer’s Kiss” and finished his career in 1999 with “Eyes Wide Shut.” He made twelve movies in those 44 years, and every one of them bears his masterful signature touch. Despite this, he never won an Oscar for directing.
  8. Akira Kurosawa. Akira Kurosawa is to Japan what Alfred Hitchcock is to America and he remains one of the greatest film directors of all time. Kurosawa made one of the most readily remade movies of all time in “Seven Samurai.” “The Hidden Fortress” is the movie that influenced “Star Wars.”
  9. Jean-Luc Godard. Jean-Luc Godard is the man who perfected the style of film known as the French New Wave. He was a major influence on Quentin Tarantino, who named his production company after Godard’s film “Bande a part.” Godard, at the age of 80, released his latest movie in 2010.
  10. Ingmar Bergman. If the only movie Ingmar Bergman ever made was “The Seventh Seal,” he could liv knowing he was one of the greatest film directors of all time. Other great films the man made include “Smiles on a Summer Night,” “Wild Strawberries” and “The Virgin Spring,” which was remade as “Last House on the Left.”

-Shawn Lealos

COMMENTS

  1. April 27, 2011 11:58 pm

    New Yorker

    “Akira Kurosawa is to Japan what Alfred Hitchcock is to America…” You mean a foreign director who made his name in his native country (England) then came to America where he directed only suspense films…?  No?  Then maybe you meant: Akira Kurosawa is to Japan what John Ford is to America.  That’s a lot closer to turth.