Best Russian Film Directors: Internationally Recognized Filmmakers

Sunday, September 4 by Andrea Miller

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	Do you want to learn more about the best Russian film <a href='http://www.screenjunkies.com/tag/directors/' class='linkify' target='_blank'>directors</a>? These Russian directors made movies that reflected the <a href=strict political climate in which they lived. Many used comedy to satirize the government and the people. Read on for the list of best Russian film directors.

Andrei Tarkovsky Tarkovsky, perhaps the most internationally lauded Russian film director, was a force in the entertainment industry since his first movie, "Ivan's Childhood," received the highest honors at the Venice Film Festival in 1962. He directed eleven features before his death in 1986 and won numerous awards for his films. These included Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival for 1983's "Nostalghia" and a BAFTA Best Foreign Language Film Award for 1986's "The Sacrifice."

Nikita Mikhalkov A director as well as an actor, Mikhalkov is often referred to as the Russian Spielberg. He first received recognition for a 1972 crime film called "A Home Among Strangers" and quickly gained acclaim for his movies, which often draw from the themes of Russian classical literature. His many awards include an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film for "Burnt By the Sun."

Georgi Daneliya This Russian film director is credited as one of the first to usher in the new wave of Soviet films in the early 1960s. He gained acclaim for his propaganda-free portraits of life in Russia, such as "Walking the Streets of Moscow." Daneliya is perhaps best known for his 1986 film "Kin-Dza-Dza," an innovative metaphorical drama about the nature of humanity.

Eldar Ryazanov This Russian film director gained popularity for his humorous satires about life in Moscow. His films were controversial, with many being banned by the Soviet censorship for their irreverent portrayal of the government. He received several international awards, including a Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or for his 1983 film "A Railway Station for Two."

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