5 Coen Brothers Movies with Odd but Lovable Characters

Friday, October 21 by Jason Cuthbert

Coe Brothers movies are known for characters that appear odd to the audience, but feel that they are completely normal in the oddest circumstances. The writing, directing, and producing partnership of the Coen Brothers have covered everything from kidnapping to bowling. Viewing these five Coen Brothers movies will provide you a solid understanding of the style of these entertaining cinematic siblings.

"No Country For Old Men" If you ever want to see a movie with a villain destined to have a starring role in your nightmares, don't miss this Coen Brothers movie. Javier Bardem plays Anton Chigurh, the personification of evil, and a fan of dolling out death via a captive bolt pistol – normally used to kill cows. His creepy mod haircut and intense stare aptly emphasizes his ill intentions to make Josh Brolin and Tommy Lee Jones' characters his next victims.

"The Big Lebowski" Jeff Bridges' portrayal of The Dude in this Coen Brothers comedy introduced the most famous slacker/bowler/White Russian drinker that Hollywood has ever seen. After a mistaken identity issue leads to his rug getting pissed on, The Dude seeks retribution with his two friends and bowling partners played by Steve Buscemi and John Goodman. The Coen Brothers find a plethora of insane situations and mishaps for The Dude to have to remedy – all in the name of his favorite carpet.

"Fargo" What kind of man hires a few guys to kidnap his family to snatch some ransom money from his father-in-law? It is this kind of quirky character dealing with desperation that populates an extraordinary Coen Brothers movie. The performance of Frances McDormand and the Coen Brother's screenplay for Fargo both won Academy Awards.

"Miller's Crossing" When it comes to movie genres, the Coen Brothers can sparkle in not only multiple genres, but by fusing multiple genres within the same movie. That is exactly what happened in this hybrid of the classic gangster story and the thriller genre. For good measure, there is a fair amount of comedy stemming from the Coen's usage of eccentric Prohibition-era slang in the screenplay.

 "True Grit" If you are only familiar with the version of "True Grit" that won John Wayne an Academy Award, then you definitely need to get familiar with the Coen Brothers' 2010 update as well. The Coen Brothers' comrade Jeff Bridges from "The Big Lebowski" plays the John Wayne role of Rooster Cogburn, a man hired to assist a young girl setting out to kill her father's murderer. Even with a full-blown Western film, the Coen Brothers bring their clever bag of colorful dialogue and strong visual imagery.

- Jason Cuthbert